Eric Edgley 1899-1967

Eric Edgley

Eric Edgley

Edgley and Dawe were featured in The Sleeping Beauty, J.C. Williamson’s 1940 pantomime at His Majesty’s in Melbourne.

Clem Dawe died suddenly in 1955, but the rest of the family carried on.

Usually in association with other managements, Edgley presented the Georgian State Dance Company (1963), the Omsk Siberian Dance Company (1964), the Great Moscow Circus (1965), the Berioska Company of Russia (1966) and the Mazowsze Dance Company of Poland (1966). Many more have followed.

Eric Edgley died in Perth on 3 February 1967.

 

After a three-month engagement in South Africa, the Edgley company headed back to Australia. Edgley and Dawe were featured in The Sleeping Beauty, J.C. Williamson’s 1940 pantomime at His Majesty’s in Melbourne. The following year JCW headlined them in the revues Funny Side Up and Thumbs Up and the panto Babes in the Wood.

In mid 1942 Edgley and Dawe – and Edna Luscombe – were featured in the Tivoli revues Hillbilly Shindig (with Bob Dyer) and Glad Rags (with George Wallace). Their later Tivoli shows included Black Rhapsody and It’s Foolish but it’s Fun (1944), Stars and Garters (1946), Top of the World (1947), Variety on Parade (1948) and Variety Cavalcade (1949). They also romped through Tivoli pantomimes such as Cinderella (1944) and Mother Goose (1945). A long season in Hobart in 1948 was followed by a move to Perth in 1951.

Edgley and Dawe leased Perth’s venerable His Majesty’s Theatre from its owners, Westralian Wheat Buildings Pty Ltd, which had purchased the building as an investment the year before. ‘Edgley and Dawe Attractions’ inaugurated their tenancy with yet another Midnight Frolics and, the following year, Vaudeville Revue. In 1954 the Edgley interests bought a seven-year lease of the theatre. In between Edgley attractions – mostly revues – the theatre was leased to east coast entrepreneurs such as J.C. Williamson’s, Tibor Rudas, David N. Martin’s Tivoli Circuit and Garnet H. Carroll. The Edgleys also sponsored seasons at His Majesty’s by local groups such as the Gilbert and Sullivan Society of Western Australia and the West Australian Ballet Company. Jack Neary looked after the Edgley interests in Sydney and an old family friend, Chesney Allen – the ‘Allen’ of Flanagan and Allen – represented them in London. Eric Edgley’s son, Phillip, a former actor, was business and publicity manager.

Clem Dawe died suddenly in 1955, but the rest of the family carried on. By the end of the decade, rising costs and competition from television forced Edgley to try a new approach. A meeting in London in 1960 with the Soviet ambassador led to an invitation to Moscow for discussions with the Soviet Ministry of Culture. This resulted in the 1962 visits of 25 stars of the Moscow State Variety Theatre, a small ensemble from the Bolshoi Ballet, and the celebrated violinist Valeri Klimov. The success of these bold ventures effectively gave the Edgley organisation exclusive access to the best that the Soviet Union had to offer. Usually in association with other managements, Edgley presented the Georgian State Dance Company (1963), the Omsk Siberian Dance Company (1964), the Great Moscow Circus (1965), the Berioska Company of Russia (1966) and the Mazowsze Dance Company of Poland (1966). Many more have followed.

Gregory Ivanoff, Eric Edgley’s brother-in-law, became musical director of the St James Theatre, Sydney, and later moved to Hobart where he broadcast, taught and gave concerts until his death in 1965. Eric Edgley died in Perth on 3 February 1967. His family continued to import companies from behind what was then the Iron Curtain and, in October 1969, they bought the freeholds of His Majesty’s and its adjoining hotel. Though they sold both properties in 1972, they retained a lease on the theatre until 1976.

Phillip, Edgley’s son by his first marriage, died in 1999. Edna, Eric Edgley’s beloved second wife, died in 2000. Edgley’s daughter, Christine, had a short acting career before becoming involved in the organisational side of the family business, while her brother, Michael, inherited all his parents’ show business flair, and continues to head the Edgley enterprise. His daughter, Gigi, is an actress.

Frank Van Straten, 2007

Media Gallery

Edgley and Dawe

[Photograph taken by Yvonne Mme courtesy National Library of Australia pic-vn3600578]

Biographical references

Victoria Chance: ‘Eric Edgley’, in Companion to Theatre in Australia.Currency Press, 1995
Terry Crew: ‘Eric Edgley’, in Australian Dictionary of Biography, volume 14. Melbourne University Press
David Hough: A Dream of Passion,His Majesty’s Theatre Foundation, 2004
John McCallum: Life with Googie, Heinemann, 1979Frank Van Straten: Tivoli, Lothian Books, 2003